Tag Archives: mosaic

Unfaithful to Sewing: Another Mosaic Table

We’ve finally started the summer holidays around my parts which finally gives me some time to potter about and concentrate on some creative pursuits. Normally, this would of course mean sewing, but right now we’re having an exchange student to stay and he feels a bit lonely if I don’t spend time with him, so hiding myself away in the sewing room is out of the question at the moment. So I decided that my patio table needed sprucing up and started making another mosaic table top (table 1 is here – I had pains in my elbow from using the tile cutter for about six months afterwards, so my turnover of mosaic tables is about 1 every three years.)

I started playing around with shapes:

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I plan on having a marble border around the perimeter of the table:

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The marble already comes glued to netting, so it’ll be a quick and easy job installing it. The only actual mosaic will be the inset. I’m hoping for two effects, apart from ease of installment: I think a whole table filled with a busy mosaic (which is the only kind of mosaic that seems to come from my fingers) is not going to be very restful to the eye, so I hope the border will tone this down. In addition, the ready made border is likely to be more level than my mosaic, so any plates will sit better on this border than on the inset. Plus I had the marble in my stash, back from my first mosaic phase, so that’ll finally have to go.

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So the next thing is an explosion of my mosaic stash on the patio table. All meals to be taken indoors for the time being… I am fully able to chat along while working on the mosaic though.

IMG_3731For the first time I’m following the indirect method of laying a mosaic. This means (I might sound as if I know this, but in reality I read about this for the first time a few days ago) that the mosaic is first layed on paper face down, then it is installed on the final surface as the completed mosaic paperside up and then the paper removed, thus revealing a beautiful and smooth mosaic. So much for the theory – apparently, even the Romans used it.

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Here you can see that the tiles are glued on face down. I’m using glass mosaic which has the advantage of being almost the same colour face up or face down. Ceramic tiles are white or brown on the bottom, so using the face down method you’d have no idea about your motive. I’m already finding it difficult with glas mosaic, because the bottom isn’t smooth and that changes the brightness of the colours and the overall effect, so I don’t know how proper mosaic artists do this working with ceramic tiles. I just hope it’s all gonna work out for the best.

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I’m following the famous Said&Done No-Pattern-method. I just don’t have the skills to visualise and plan out an overall look first as a pattern, so I simply decided I would follow a loose flower meadow design and call this artistic 😉

Let’s talk again when the whole thing is complete, ey?!

 

Merken

What does a girl do when she can’t sew…

and when her sewing room has no more empty boxes to hold cut projects in the sewing queue?

Well, she moves down to a very chilly basement and starts a mosaic project

IMG_2971This is going to be the table top for a serving trolley/butcher’s bench – you know the kind everyone bought from Ikea about 10 years ago.

This is the inspiration. I’m pleased to know that this is going to result in “sophisticated home style”!

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And here are some teeny tiny pieces of mosaic which hopefully will all find a room in this project.

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Mosaic is almost like quilting: you cut up bits of tile and then assemble them together again.

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But the big advantage is that once the piecing is done, the project needs no quilting (which to my mind is the worst part of making a quilt) but only grouting which is done in no time at all.

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What do you do when, for one reason or another, you can’t sew?

 

No Sewing, But Still My Proudest Make: Large Mosaic Table

It’s got nothing to do with sewing, but it’s still handmade – and it’s my most complicated, most time-consuming project and the one I’m most proud of ever: my garden mosaic table

IMG_8849The table is handmade from start to finish, beginning with some slightly questionable sewing of the round table top to the copper band finishing the sides.

IMG_8851The table is 125cm in diameter and will sit the five of us comfortably. It was made specifically to fit into our garden pavilion.

As a stand for the table top I bought an old Singer sewing machine stand off ebay:

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The table has actually been in use for two years, but I only completed it last week with the addition of the copper band. Originally I had put mosaic tiles around the perimeter of the table, but they had all fallen off in the frost (the table lives outdoors all years round) and so I was looking for a more robust finish and I think the copper band looks great.

IMG_8853At the moment it’s still a bit shiny, but over time it will darken and get closer in tone to the table stand.

I have to say that I really love this table, and I would happily continue making mosaic furniture – but there is only so much mosaic furniture a house can take ;-).

IMG_8861I even added this chandelier in order to celebrate the completion of this labour of love. Of course the weather turned cold the next day… But at least I got one night to try!

 

 

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