Tag Archives: Burda

Burdastyle 3/2013 #103: The Brexit Coat Part III: Some Leadership!

Well, what can I say? I sure didn’t think that the connection between sewing and political life was quite so direct. But in view of the event of the day I decided that some leadership was needed and put a collar on the Brexit Coat.

Yes, I know I asked for your vote on no collar or Peter Pan collar. But what can I say – listening to experts is not what should be done on a Brexit Coat.

But let’s look at the poll first:

Clearly, no collar won over Peter Pan collar – and a notched collar was nowhere on the ballott sheet. But that’s what you are getting, suck it up, you lost! (Well, you didn’t loose, but I’m not sure that matters)

I other news it seems that the outward looking option of a snazzy lining seems to be ahead in the voting process rather than the make do and mend option of the plain lining. However, I considered my stash and realised that there might be another option hiding in there. Which one that is I’m not going to reveal at this stage as I like to keep my options close to my chest.

What I really enjoyed is the addition of “Other” – the almost Goove-ian subversiveness of this addition becomes the whole project, I think.

Now, when I started on the notched collar I realised that it is a lot more complicated than I was expecting! Somehow, I cut the facing piece too short and only realised what the problem was after I was missing what I should have had. This will forever go down in history as the Welsh Farmer move.

So I had to add another little piece to the facing to make up for the subsid — ahh, piece that I had cut off.

So I almost wonder if no coat might be better than a bad coat?

But I took heart from Nigel Farage (and no, I never thought I would say that), thinking that if the Brexit Coat didn’t work out I could simply go and buy myself a RTW coat – of course not without making ALL OF YOU have to wear the coat that I botched up,  mwahaha.

So while I ponder that thought, I wll give you the cold sholder and think of my sewing programme.

Burdastyle 9/2013 #103: The Brexit Coat Part II: A Plea For Help

The Brexit Coat has come on in leaps and bounds from its inception as a distraction from other things that should have been more important.

Remember when in my last post I confessed that I had started without a plan to such a degree that I didn’t even own the Burda magazine that the coat came from anymore and so didn’t have the option to trace the skirt pieces that I needed to make the Brexit coat a success?

Well, miracles do happen! Anne, the Compulsive Seamstress, came to me in my hour of need and offered to trace the missing part for me (she has a comprehensive Burda collection and clearly doesn’t do things as short sighted as throwing out old magazines just because she thinks a little tidying should be done). And she didn’t only offer and then retract her participation as is customary for the Brexit process. On no, she followed through:- only  a few days later the beautifully traced pattern pieces arrived in the post, making this the perfect Easter present! Thank you so much, Anne!

So this is where I am now: Bodice and skirt completed.

I rather like the sleeve construction where the raglan sleeves form a front and back yoke:

And look, this Brexit Coat has pockets – if that doesn’t send a message to the politicians I don’t know what will (although I do admit I have no idea what that message is, but I have a feeling that doesn’t matter in all things Brexit):

 

But now I’ve stalled again, and like last time when Anne gave me a helping hand I hope you, my dear readers, will now. Because I have more Brexit decisions to make and I don’t quite know what I want. Collar or no collar? Do I want a hard border between my coat and my neck?

On the left there is the Brexit Coat’s older, but little sister (and if you think that is a contradiction you’d better not believe anything that’s written on the side of a bus!). Do you think I should use that Peter Pan type collar again? Or maybe leave it collarless?

And how about buttons? Self-covered buttons like on the Little Sister Jacket? Or should I try and find something exciting?

And the the lining: Should I go with a plain white or light blue lining to match the colours of the fabric? Or use something snazzy? The biannual fabric market comes to town next Saturday, so I could find something there. On the other hand I have white lining in my stash and surely any Brexit Coat should be about self-sufficiency? Especially given that most vendors on the fabric market are in fact foreign?

I realise that my little blog doesn’t have many readers, much like the EU commission’s sadly under-appreciated 2004 leaflet “How to avoid mass immigration from Eastern Europe if you feel it’s not the right thing for your country at the present time”. But I’m still hoping for at least 27 votes on all the important issues for the Brexit Coat. Anybody can vote – you can add your own options and you don’t even have to have a dubitable human rights record in order to share your values with me.

In order to appeal to my British readers I have created a little referendum for you. I appreciate it’s a little more complicated than you are used to, because it has many options. But on the other hand you can click as many as you like and it will be my job to glean from your choices the Will of the People (TM) in order to deliver for you a blue white and blue Brexit Coat.

So please: Do vote! You know your vote counts! Just please, don’t delived a 50/50 verdict!

 

Merken

Merken

The Hila and Teresa Tops #sewdowndewsbury

I’ve already written about how much I enjoyed #sewdowndewsbury and spending time with Ali of Thimberlina. Another thing I was particulary looking forward to was meeting Hila and Teresa, who I’d already felt a connection with via their blogs  and 2015’s antics of Jumping Into June.

Turns out that they are just as fantastic in person as they are on their blogs – and maybe on some cosmic level there is a connection between me and them, because we bought the same fabric in Fabworks. If that isn’t proof that we met in some earlier life or something then I don’t know what is!!

So I decided to call my makes after them – so may I introduce the Hila and Teresa tops.

First up the Hila.

This cowl neck top, one of the many Burda permutations is one of my favourite patterns. So far I had only made longsleeve or sleeveless versions of it, but a picture on Lucie‘s blog convinced me that actually it looks really smashing with short sleeves.

One thing I changed from the Burda pattern is the size of the cowl. I made it a little bit less pronounced by pinching out a little from the pattern and also by making the shoulder seem come closer to the neck. In that way the cowl doesn’t open quite as far as normal and bra-revealing accidents are a thing of the past.

See:

There’s your evidence. Yep, I follow the scientific method on this blog!

Next up is the Teresa blouse:

Fashioned from spotty cotton lawn/batiste (which unfortunately creases like a thing possessed, so much so that I’m inclined to group it with “creases are fashionable” linen).

I used the Barbara pattern from Maison Victor 3/4 2017

As you can see, the patter is acutally for a dress, so I just lenghtened the bodice and eyeballed a few changes to make it look right.

Do you know Maison Victor, by the way?

It’s the younger hipster’s answer to sewing magazines. I’m neither young nor a hipster, but ever since I cancelled my Burda subscription I feel I have leave to buy loads of other magazines. It has some nice boy’s and men’s patterns that come in slim sizes (those hipsters don’t seem to be very hungry…) so that’s good for my boys.

Back to the Teresa:

I love the scoop neckline – I know that choking high necklines are all the rage, but all the do for me is give me a rage (plus they look ridiculous on me, my head seems to be twice the size when I wear a very high neckline), so I was pleased about this variation. The blouse has a gathered back bodice and a yoke with I lined in a remnant because I was worried the dots of the fashion fabric might show through to the front.
I think the rick rack makes this – just breaks up the fabric enought to add a little bit of interest.

The blouse was a big hit with my students today (“Oh Miss, you look very pretty today” “Hush, don’t tell her that, tell her she looks pretty all the time” “But she looks particularly pretty today” – sometimes you just gotta love teaching 🙂 ), so I am pleased to have scored in a young person’s world. Maybe there’s a hipster in me yet?

So, Hila and Teresa: it was lovely to meet you in Dewsbury and I’ll think of you every time I wear these tops!

 

Wish you were there – a throwback to summer

Goodness, where has the time gone? It only seems like yesterday that I was on holiday in Mallorca wishing it might be just a little bit cooler – now that autumn has started to bite I look back at those pictures with yearning for the heat.

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We spent a thoroughly wonderful forthnight in a villa in central Mallorca – what a wonderful island! It was our first time there and already I’m hoping to be able to go back soon!

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So this dress with its palm fronds and sunsets is a fitting reflection of the mood of these holidays.

img_4334And did I mention the reflections of light on water across the chest area? Perfect holiday dress, ey?

It’s a really simple shift dress with French darts from an older edition of Burdastyle. I traced the pattern before I thought of labelling the pattern parts properly so I’m unable to identify the magazine it came from.

img_4364Oh see, it works for midnight strolls across Spanish village plazas too!

Sigh – wish I were there!

Burdastyle 4/2016: A Little Review

Just to recap: Burdastyle and I had not been seeing eye to eye for a while in 2014 and 15 and so I cancelled my subscription mid 2015 in what almost felt like a divorce. Then I went to buy every edition apart from one at the kiosk, so when the nice lady from Burdastyle called and offered an eight-month subscription for the price of 3 months, what could I do but agree.

Ever since Burda has been on probation I’ve felt a lot more positive about their offering and April is no exception. In fact, their feature on solid colours is a revelation for me: I would wear every single garment as is (although not all those colours might suit me), but I just love love love the styling.

IMG_2960This is my favourite outfit. It’s nothing special, but it’s an outfit I could jump into straight away and wear every day. The trousers could be my new uniform from spring and I’ve already traced the top (which is for drapey wovens, so I might get to use those silp remnants I’ve been stashing).

IMG_2961Then I’ve just fallen head over heals for this dress. I already bought a berry/purple viscose knit, which I’m hoping will be able to hold its shape with the help of a little structural underling in the bodice and underbust band.

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I do realise that the dress might look a little maternity with those tummy pleats, but I suppose I’m coming to an age where the thought of “Can she still get pregnant?” might start to be flattering again, so I’m going with the flow. I have an event on 1st April where this dress might come in handy, so hoping that i get my sewing machine back in time this jumps right to the top of the queue.

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I’m not sure what it is, but I love this too! It really is just a tunic lenghtened into a dress, and normally Burda do these in crazy patterns which I like, but never love. But in a solid I just think it’s really stylish.

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Look, this really is all it is: If it goes well, this could be done in an evening!

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It looks good in crazy print too and gives rise to all sorts of colour blocking ideas too. On the right there is “my” dress again.

Oh, and then jumpsuits!

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This is for petite sizing, so I doubt I would be able to make this work for me, but isn’t this all kinds of wonderful? I do have fabric for a jumpsuit lurking around, so I’m collecting ideas!

So yes, I’m kinda surprised to learn that I love solids in loud colours! Recently I have bought a lot of prints thinking that they would endulge my love of colour in the best possible way, but maybe I’ve always been more of a solid kinda girl? Who knows…

But in case solids aren’t your jam, at least here’s a full view of all the patterns in April’s edition:

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IMG_2967There is some lovely stuff in the plus size section, some really sweet and classic girl’s dresses and even men’s shorts. I guess my Burda subscription will continue for the time being!

Burdastyle 4/2014 #110: Pleat Front Trousers of Two Years

Peeps, I’m back! I’d deserted this blog for the past few weeks, not even finishing the second pair of jeans I was trying to make for Jeans in January. I don’t think they were missed though, as there were many other pairs of fabulous jeans that saw the light of day in January. I will write a summary post once I get the chance.
I did have a good reason for the radio silence: the written part of the philosophy exams I’m taking in order to qualify for teaching philosophy here in Bavaria. Unfortunately one exam didn’t go well at all, so I need to pull out all stops for the orals – but they are only in April, so normal service will resume here at least for a little while!

So today I would like to show you the trousers that took me two years to make. Well, only one day of each year, to be honest, but those were New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day – which goes to show how boring I am that I spend both days sewing rather than on unbridled partying 😉

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These trousers are part of my drive to test new trouser shapes. See, while I love making jeans I think the ubiquitous skinny shape is quite boring. Nice, versatile, but boring. So I’ve been experimenting with different trouser shapes and the pleat front is one of them. To be honest, I’m not sure that these, Burdastyle 4/2014 #110, work on me, but I liked that I tried.

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As a pear shape I always think that pleat front trousers should be great because they hide the hip  area – but I never consider that in doing so they draw the eye to exactly that area. In fact I had made these trousers before, when the pattern came out in 2014, but donated them after one wear because they just made me look so big. Then I saw a version of these on a blog recently, unfortunately I can’t find the link or name anymore, where they were slimmed down along the leg and just looked great.

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I used a navy wool suiting from my stash to make these. As I said, I love the theory of them, the way the pleats open from the hip bone rather than from the tummy area. In order to emphasise this effect I stitched them closed for the first 3 cm.

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If I decide to keep these, I might make the lower leg a bit smaller still, but as I said, I’m not really sure yet. I should add that I have worn these a few times so far, so they seem to fill a wardrobe gap of sorts.

For the first time ever I made welt pockets that look as nice inside as out:

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The pattern didn’t have the pockets, I added them kinda following this tutorial, but I only used one continuous length of the fashion fabric rather than using lining fabric and fashion fabric. For the first time it clicked on how to sew French seams on inside pockets (the Ginger jeans have those as well) – it’s a very pleasing look I think!

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So in all the jury is out on these: Construction-wise they are proably the best work I have produced in my trouser-making journey (even the invisible zip is truly invisible!), but shape-wise this journey surely isn’t at an end.

In a triumph of hope over experience I haven’t given up on the pleat front shape just yet. Next up (after another pair of Gingers that graces my sewing machine at the moment) is Burdastyle 1/2015 119, thought I don’t intend to make them in shiny material and add a crazy waist bow – not even I am that deluded… Who knows, maybe I will have got pleat fronts out of my system after the next try??

Talking about Burda: I think Burda have picked up again for the last few issues – there is a lot I like and some numbers have made it right on my to sew list. Those of you who, like me, walk the Burda way: what do you think? Burda 2016 yay or nay?

 

A Look Down Memory Lane – in Honour of Jeans in January

Thank you so much to all of you who’ve already said they will join Jeans in January – and a big welcome to those of you who are still thinking about it!
A few of you are planning to make their first ever pair of jeans, some want to hone their craft. I kinda fall into both categories.
I made a fair few pair of jeans, using three different patterns, but I only wear one regularly.
The first pair of jeans I ever made was Burdastyle 4/2010 #120 . When I started making jeans I didn’t really understand about stretch percentages in fabrics yet – so some of the pairs I made form non-stretch or barely-stretch fabric were simply too tight (first try)

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or too loose (second attempt).

I also decided that I perfer a higher rise that contains both muffin top and butt crack and so I stopped experimenting with this patten.

Then I tried bootcut jeans, Jalie 2908, again in a barely stretchy fabric, which unfortunately caused my completing a pair of jeans , pattern size chosed exactly according to my measurements, finished with lovingly executed top-stitching, that I wore exactly once.

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It turned out so tight that my lady bits felt quite uncomfortable, so they went to the back of the cupboard to wait for slimmer days. Well, don’t hold your breath for a reappearance, I tried them on the other day and I can’t even do them up now. All those pies taste a lot better than their result looks… However, I’m certainly not done with this pattern, so a hopefully much better fitting version will feature in Jeans in January.

Finally, my third and (to date) only truly successful jeans pattern is Burdastyle 3/2014 #115. It’s my go to skinny jeans pattern and I lost count of the versions I made. Here, here, here and here is a little bit of evidence. But in fact the one pair of jeans that I wear most often isn’t even properly blogged:

Same pattern, look at the bottoms here, of course, not the blouse!

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So by and large I’m really happy with this pattern – BUT I still have a little bit of an issue with the back crotch that isn’t quite 100 % the way I would like it.

I did consider the possibility that my behind might not be quite 100% the way I would like it, but in the world of all-shapes-are-beautiful-sewists that would be heresy, wouldn’t it?! So during Jeans in January I’m going to throw myself into the adventure of trying a new pattern, the Ginger, of course, because truly: I haven’t seen a single bad version of them in blogland ever.

How about yourselves? Do you have previous regarding jeans sewing? And highs or lows to share? Or are you one of the (apparently) many jeans virgins who printed off the Ginger and never managed or dared to go further?

LOTILDA

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