Burdastyle 3/2014 #115: Skinny Jeans

First of all I would like to thank all of you who responded so kindly to my latest post, especially to the issue of “interesting” photography. It appears there seems to be a market out there for my particular style of posing. Who would have thought! You girls rock!
Of course, your wish is my command and I have a section of extra special photgraphs for your viewing pleasure today:

IMG_0168See, I didn’t promise too much, did I? This is me, modelling the latest addition to my closet, Burdastyle 3/2014 #115, the skinny jeans that everybody who makes skinny jeans seems to have made already. I’ve been kinda on the fence about skinny jeans for the longest time, both on me but also as a general concept, but now they have been around so long that even I have got used to the look. I didn’t make mine quite properly skinny, more like a slim-fit jeans. I may not know how to pose, but I do know that the sausage-trouser look is not for me!

IMG_0159For the first time EVER I made real, bona fide muslin (I had a rather unwisely purchased fabric – online purchase rather late at night, you might know the deal) to check the fit of the pattern. It kinda worked straight off, but I changed the crotch shape a little and took a little lenght out of the front crotch, so for the first time EVER I have no fabric pooling around where the zipper meets the front crotch line.

IMG_0233This is the muslin, you can see the original stitching line with a 1/2 inch seam allowance and then the updated, slightly larger crotch line. I also took a wedge out our the CB.

I cut a size 42 and the jeans came out just a little bit large, but that might have been because of the very, very stretchy fabric I was using. Starting with the size 42, Burda make these jeans higher rise, the smaller sizes are about 3cm lower.

IMG_0165You can see this is quite high, but I like it this way. Nobody is going to be much the wiser anyway because I’m unlikely to wear anyting tucked into these jeans. However, if you wanted the lower rise, it would be extremely easy, even in the larger sizes, as you simple need to trace the lower rise line.

IMG_0161But as I said, I don’t mind the higher rise, I quite like that booty contained.

IMG_0162I seamed these at ankle length, the original pattern is around 2cm longer than this. FYI I’m 173cm tall, so these do finish quite long even though the pattern is for a standard size. I have found that with the newer Burda patterns I rarely have to add extra length to the standard pattern. I wonder where my extra length is distributed on my body if it’s neither the legs nor the upper body (I recently cut a petite size bodice and had to add about 2cm to the arm hole, but that was it!! How does that work???)

All in all I’m really pleased with these jeans. They are not exciting or anything, more a workhorse type garment, but I did promise myself I would sew more of those anyway. And when I asked my husband to take these pictures, he didn’t even realise these jeans were hand-made! I call that a win! Two more versions are somewhere in my production line!

How about you: Are you flattered when somebody mistakes your handmades for RTW? Or are you insulted because someone doesn’t recognise the amount of work you put in?

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22 thoughts on “Burdastyle 3/2014 #115: Skinny Jeans

  1. navybluethreads November 2, 2014 at 8:21 pm Reply

    Definitely a win! These look great on you and I bet you’ll wear them loads. I’m with you on avoiding the skinny-sausage leg look and liking a higher waist. Though mine’s to contain post-children stomach area: strictly for my eyes only 😉

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:50 pm Reply

      Yeah, I tend to suck in my stomach for the pictures and only release it in the lonely comfort of my own home 😉

  2. Nakisha November 2, 2014 at 8:31 pm Reply

    Great jeans!! I was eyeing this pattern recently. So glad to see them made up. I really like your back pocket design too!

    I am usually flattered when people mistake handmades for rtw. Why? Because most people are not sewers and they have no idea what goes into handmade garments; RTW is their measuring stick.

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:50 pm Reply

      Yes, I was thinking that as well. Most people couldn’t appreciate hand-made, because they don’t understand what it entails.

  3. Tia Dia November 2, 2014 at 9:07 pm Reply

    Wow! Great job on these. And yay for making a muslin first (chuckling knowingly). They look fabulous on you. Looks like a possible TNT, no?

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:49 pm Reply

      Yep, they have moved in the “make again” category and in fact I cut two other pairs yesterday. Unfortunately, a major job at work is between me and these jeans for now…

  4. SewingElle November 2, 2014 at 10:15 pm Reply

    Awesome jeans. And those photos are very arty with the shadows and autumn leaves.

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:48 pm Reply

      Oh thank you! 🙂

  5. Gjeometry November 2, 2014 at 10:36 pm Reply

    The jeans look great on you! I find I’m more excited when people don’t guess my outfit is home-made. Since I’m not an advanced sewist, I find when folks recognize I sewed something, it’s likely because it looks home-made.

  6. Anonymous November 3, 2014 at 2:46 am Reply

    Great jeans. You mention stretch material. What kind of fabric did you use?
    I do enjoy skinny jeans, would like to make some in the near future. I am not sure about fabric stretch content. I take full credit for home-made when someone ask. I have returned RTW pieces due to poor quality, shirts that are short on fabric. I do prefer my shirts a bit longer.
    Thanks for sharing

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:48 pm Reply

      I used a cotton stretch twill. No great quality, so I can’t even say much about the degree of stretch. I would describe it as “really quite stretchy”, but I guess that isn’t a technical term 😉

  7. Carolyn B November 3, 2014 at 9:12 am Reply

    Love your jeans and your ‘keeping it real’ photos. I’ve made these – they are really skinny so I needed to size up too!

  8. Gail November 3, 2014 at 12:32 pm Reply

    Your new jeans came out really well. I must try this pattern as Burda pants usually fit me without a lot of adjustments.

    • Chris November 3, 2014 at 12:46 pm Reply

      Yes, I seem to be in luck with Burda pants as well. Do make sure your fabric has plenty of stretch and you should be fine!

  9. Linda of Nice dress! Thanks, I made it!! November 4, 2014 at 4:50 am Reply

    Nice jeans! And what a compliment! I like the surprised look I get when I say I made something!

  10. MsMcCall November 4, 2014 at 8:45 am Reply

    Well done on these, you got a really great fit. I’ve made them up too and I love them. I’m making jeans right now and was going to go boring on the back pockets, but your design is inspiring me. I should do a little something interesting I guess.

  11. jay November 4, 2014 at 8:08 pm Reply

    Nice jeans!

  12. […] what can I say. I do love my first pair of skinny jeans and I love the colour red and on my last visit to the fabric market what made me deviate from my […]

  13. […] are another version of my go-to jeans pattern, Burdastyle 3/14 #115 which I made before here and […]

  14. […] Don’t hold your breath, nothing new to see here – just another pair of my TNT skinny jeans, Burdastyle 3/14 #104: […]

  15. […] jeans in those photos are my latest iteration of Burdastyle 3/14 #115, which I did again here and here and there are a few unblogged versions. I think I got the front […]

  16. […] 3/2014 #115. It’s my go to skinny jeans pattern and I lost count of the versions I made. Here, here, here and here is a little bit of evidence. But in fact the one pair of jeans that I wear […]

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